Would You Be Interested in Creating your Own One of a Kind Original Cup Noodle?

THE INSATANT RAMEN MUSEUM IN THE SPECIFIED ADDRESS OF 8-25 MASUMICHO, IKEDA-SHI, OSAKA-FU

THE INSATANT RAMEN MUSEUM IN THE SPECIFIED ADDRESS OF 8-25 MASUMICHO, IKEDA-SHI, OSAKA-FU

You have the liberty to create your very own original flavored cup noodle from the 4 soup mixtures and 12 cup noodle ingredients of your choice. The catch is that the choices are limited and yet very generous. You may add one and no more of the soup flavor for your cup noodle along with the 12 different types of ingredients that allows the valued costumer to pick a maximum of 4 ingredients to put into your cup noodle creation. You have as many as 5460 cup noodle combinations possible to create from with 1 soup flavored powder and 4 ingredients per cup noodle in accordance to your desire. The choices that you may pick out of are limited, but they are lavishly quality graded choices of flavors from spices to dried cup noodle style bite-sized foods.  

If you enjoy art, you also have the opportunity to design your own blank noodle cup at the My Cup Noodle Factory. You get to draw and create colors around the plastic surface of your blank white container which this institution has prepared for creative usage. 

FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE CLEANLINESS AND FRIENDLINESS IS TOP NOTCH HERE

FROM MY PERSONAL EXPERIENCE CLEANLINESS AND FRIENDLINESS IS TOP NOTCH HERE

Inside this museum, there also lies a Chicken Ramen Factory, separately from the My Cup Noodle Factory. Here, you will get help from the person hosting this wonderfully organized event and create the long noodle shape and length by working with soon-to-becoming noodle dough made from flour, and experience the making of this world's first instant noodle.

Even at this Chicken Ramen Factory, the Japanese staff generally has excellent service, especially in terms of friendliness, respect and humbleness. When I engaged myself in this particular department, the person who was in charge of frying the very noodle that I crafted, sincerely smiled at me when he handed me my freshly made noodles. It's quite a friendly environment as the worker smiled as people took photos of him to show that he is happy working there with the customers and staff. 

STARTING WITH THE COMPANY'S FIRST CUP NOODLE PACKAGE OF THE CHICKEN RAMEN, YOU MAY GLANCE AT THE 800 DIFFERENT DESIGNS AND TYPES OF CUP NODDLE PACKAGES THAT ARE ORGANIZED WITH PRECISION ACCORDING TO WHEN EACH OF THE PRODUCTS BECAME AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE.

STARTING WITH THE COMPANY'S FIRST CUP NOODLE PACKAGE OF THE CHICKEN RAMEN, YOU MAY GLANCE AT THE 800 DIFFERENT DESIGNS AND TYPES OF CUP NODDLE PACKAGES THAT ARE ORGANIZED WITH PRECISION ACCORDING TO WHEN EACH OF THE PRODUCTS BECAME AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE.

At the main Instant Ramen Museum gallery which you can visit for free, you can see how the master cup-noodle craftsmen, Momofuku Ando, endeavored through the many trails of misfortune until he created his very first instant ready-to-go cup noodle, the chicken ramen.

This wooden house is the exact replicated recreation of what the research laboratory looked like where Mr. Ando fathered the world's first cup noodle.

This wooden house is the exact replicated recreation of what the research laboratory looked like where Mr. Ando fathered the world's first cup noodle.

In times of high customer volume, a waiting time may be applied, and in some cases, the cup noodle crafting services may end earlier than listed below. In order to combat that from happening, you may want to attend the museum as early as you can. For the Chicken Noodle Factory, you must make reservations prior to your visit.

LOCATION:
8-25 Masumicho, Ikeda-shi, Osaka-fu

OPERATING TIMES:
9:30am - 4:00pm (last admission 3:30pm)

HOLIDAYS:
Tuesdays, New Years
(If Tuesday is a National Holiday, the following Wednesday will be closed)

PRICE:
Entrance - free
My Cup Noodle Factory - 300JPY (No reservations needed)
My Chicken Noodle Factory - 500JPY (junior high and above), 300 JPY (up to elementary)
                                                 (Reservations must be made)

For more information, please visit their website.

WEBSITE:
http://www.instantramen-museum.jp/en/ 

Staying in a ryokan

A ryokan, or a traditional Japanese-style inn, has become a must for most travelers going to Japan.

This is completely understandable: where else in the world can you sleep on bamboo (tatami) mat floors on futon, bathe in hot springs, and be served traditional Japanese full-course meals in your room?

An amazing ryokan, though, can really impact your budget- to stay in a high-quality ryokan during a peak travel season (like during cherry blossoms or fall foliage) can set you back over $1,000 per night. While there are cheap ryokan out there, you might not find yourself getting the experience that you want.

This post, then, is dedicated to how to get the kind of experience you want that fits into your budget.

1. Plan ahead. Within the last year alone, travel to Japan has increased by about 50%. That's a huge increase, and hotels and ryokan haven't quite caught up yet. This means that accommodations book quickly, and sooner than expected. Hotels and ryokan can be booked about a year in advance, and that's probably the best time to do it. 

2. Consider traveling during off season. Personally, I like doing this anyway because it means that everywhere is less crowded. This is a great option if you like temples and shrines, too, because it means you'll have a little more peaceful alone time. For ryokan, though, it means you have a better chance at booking a room, and it could be cheaper, too.

3. Don't spend every night in a ryokan. Even though it may seem like a hassle, it might be worth it to splurge just for one or two nights on a truly amazing ryokan, and to book a simple, no-frills hotel for the rest of your stay. That way, you can get the experience of it without breaking the bank.

From The New York Times Travel- Solo in Tokyo

View the original article here.

"Tokyo is an ideal city for solo travel. Tables for two or more are not the default arrangement, thanks to standing sushi bars and long counters at restaurants specializing in tempura, ramen and soba. It is not uncommon to sit opposite a sushi chef and talk, or to order a meal from a restaurant ticket machine and enjoy it on a stool alongside other solo diners. At department store food halls, one can buy bento boxes, hot dumplings, and savory pancakes known as okonomiyaki and dig in at nearby tables. And at any 7-Eleven (they’re ubiquitous and a go-to lunch spot) onigiri, balls of rice filled with meat, fish or vegetables that fit in your palm, can be had for a couple of dollars for a tasty lunch on the run."

No one to travel with? No worries. There are few places in the world that are as accessible and as open as Japan for single travelers.

Discovering Japan can be incredible when done on your own. Not only is it one of the safest countries in the world, but people are kind, welcoming, and helpful. Traveling on your own also allows you to be open to meeting new people, instead of just focusing on your travel partner or group.

Something else that's really special about traveling in Japan on your own is how peaceful it can be. Whether you're getting lost in a crowd in downtown Tokyo or exploring a shrine, it's easy to find peaceful moments. Most of us think about "zen" when we think about Japan, and there's a reason for that. Getting lost in Japan is far from stressful- instead, ending up in gardens off the beaten track, seeing tranquil neighborhoods, and finding that perfect little cafe- that's what getting lost, alone, in Japan is all about.